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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the campaign is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard
place in the name of science. before the long ascrention and specially designed capsule, his body had been fitted with a multitude of sensors to record his heart rate, blood pressure and other vital life signs to monitor how the human body copes with sustained free fall and acceleration and deceleration. >> keep your head down. >> to stop his blood boiling, his lungs exploding and his body disinterest at the grating he washese a pressurized suit and the whole thing is funded by a soft drink manufacturer. >> start the cameras. and i've got an angel to take care of you. >> felix baumgartner, why did you want to do this? >> well, you know, i have been -- i always have been a very competitive person, since i was 16 years old i started skydiving and i always wanted to push the limits. that's the reason why i was working on this so hard. >> but it's not like competing at tennis or at pool or a running race. to put yourself on the edge of space miles and miles up, i mean, that's completely different. >> it is, but that's what makes it so unique and challenging, because if you look at my back
industrial revolution in which the application of science utterly transforms the way we do almost everything. one of the latest transformative technologies is 3-d printing. it sounds absurd, it sounds impossible, but it promises to refashion whole arias of design. -- whole areas of design. >> due to the crafted objects made with care and great precision, they haven't been scrupted, or machine pressed. a different process has been employed. this is 3-d presenting. -- printing. >> at the design studio in london they can not only conceive products, they can make them, thanks to a technology that is falling in price and so becoming more accessible. it allows you to make just about anything. i'm being scanned with software, then building a precise template of my face. that will then be used to print out a 3-d me. so i've been scanned. what's next in the process? >> we prepare it into a print-ready file and we take you over here to this machine. >> you don't have to send it off to a factory somewhere? >> no, right here. it's an office-friendly machine that sits in a corner. and this will print you
the art and science of prediction and the signal and the noise, by so many predictions, why so many predictions fail and some don't i am pleased to have nate silver back at this table, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> so where do you based on your polling, see the presidential race at this moment? >> we have obama as a modest favorite still and i should say it is not my polling what we go is look at everyone easels poll and average them together and think about the electorial college if you look at ohio still, obama is ahead in most polls of ohio he is ahead in most polls of iowa, wisconsin, and nevada as well and those four states. >> rose: by two or three points. >> two or three-point not an overwhelming margin but you can look historically and how often does a candidate who has a two or three-point lead in an election, does he how often does he convert that to a win and the answer is about 75 percent of the time. >> rose: so you said 75 percent likely obama will be elected? >> that's right because the states are what we call the tipping point states that would swing the elector
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river co
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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